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lse:lloy

#2458

Everyday…

…more Brexit-related economic gloom:

"Figures show the UK economy has stalled since the spring as the prospect of no deal has grown. Last month construction industry output “dropped like a stone” to give its worst performance in more than 10 years, and the manufacturing industry recorded the sharpest drop in factory output for more than six years.

The Bank of England governor, Mark Carney, said a broad range of economic indicators “point to no growth in UK output” and the situation would worsen if the eventual outcome was no deal.

Speaking in Bournemouth to the Local Government Association annual conference, Carney said global markets had become deeply worried by the impact of Brexit and Donald Trump’s threats of more and higher trade tariffs against China, the EU and India.

He said the prospect of higher tariffs, possibly lasting for many years, had forced global investors to seek safe havens for their funds, restricting the money available for investment.

The Guardian, 3 July 2019

Frog in a tree


#2459

The intention was to show this comparison, rather than just using EU Countries, which is what EU fans do since it masks the fact that the UK GDP was moving in line with global trends rather than showing we were following EU trends.


#2460

The settlement bill is part of the Withdrawal Agreement, which has not been ratified by the UK Parliament, so there is no legal basis for paying this bill, [see related link]. There have been many opinions of the true magnitude of the bill, and in fact what the bill covers. Currently it is more of a moral obligation than a legal one. A new team can either confirm its acceptance of the previous tentative agreement or insist on changes to it.


#2461

I’ve definitely heard a different version from the EU side. This was said to be the whole point of settling ‘the divorce bill’ before negotiating the withdrawal agreement (I.e to agree what was owed, some of it at least I’m sure can’t be renegotiated).

The link you provide seems to say parliamentary ratification is required.

The amount will be reduced if there is a No Deal Brexit because there wont be a 2 years transition period - nor will there be staged payments, the full,reduced, amount will be due immediately … and In Euros. So on a No Deal with the GBP plunging, that will add substantially to the immediate cost outstanding.

The EU can then simply refuse to negotiate any trade deal until the amount they say is outstanding is paid. Its looking even worse than i thought.

Meanwhile Trump is targeting ‘the EU’ with tariffs - especially whisky. which will please our Scottish exporters no end. I hope they double his ‘council tax’ on all those golf courses he owns up there. That will be about the only come back we have against USA once out of the EU.


#2462

Peter I was a Tory voter but after this Brexit Fraud supported by the Tories never again. and nothing can be worse than what we have now…
YOU may have thought the campaigns were pathetic but it was more than that, it was dishonest and inciteful and many voted believing various disgraceful lies. Pushing this forward now knowing that the majority of the UK is against is immoral and just wont work…


#2463

could you have found any more confusing charts…

The point is we have done well for 43 years in the common market and EU while the LEAVE campaign have been saying we are being ripped off by them… Just basic lies…

AND its starting to show…


#2464

China and Russia are equally bad but China is far more dangerous. Depending upon who the President is the USA is pretty dangerous


#2465

Not really Eadwig at the time British industry was a nightmare, very restrictive unions and poor quality. I think the only solution Thatcher could see was to kill it off and let the fittest survive. What industry we have now is actually pretty good.


#2466

Yes, but too small to be properly self-supporting. Many small businesses went down with the coal board because it was done so quickly they never had a chance to adapt. It was very shortsighted and completely obvious if you were working in them as I was at the time.

Thatcher had another option with all those nationalised industries, she could have got decent management into them that would have stopped, for one single example, the whole of the night shift at York coach works sleeping in the sleeper cars they were supposed to be building.


#2467

The only strong countries in the world seem to have strong industries. What chance that we have a government that realises this and acts upon it


#2468

Its not just about strength. How about high value jobs (in terms of training and skills needed) that give people a sense of worth at work as opposed to answering phones and reading off a script?

These things are important for communities and their own sense of self-worth.

But then if it happens to be a blue collar job we have a culture that has always looked down on such workers; but yes, we need a far more balanced economy than we have, which means manufacturing has to at least double. That means re-opening technical colleges.

We need to start rebuilding our town centres while there is still something to build on too, and make towns unique again instead of full of retail chains that leave holes in every high street when they go out of business (having put all the original, local shops out of business previously. E.g. Sports shops, toy shops, cafes, pubs, chemists, opticians etc etc)

These are the sorts of things we have just spent 3 and a half years ignoring while they get worse because Brexit has taken up so much time in government.

Then another 10-15 years working on trade deals to give our manufacturing markets to sell into - except they’ll be gone by then.


#2469

Surprised no mention of Ann’s wonderful speech on democracy given to the EU members today ? The EU Groupies silence on the complete lack of the EU following there own written rules yesterday says it all. Indefensible no doubt, hence the lack of reporting on here.


#2470

I read the report on Widdecombe’s speech. Pretty repellent to compare Brexit to the experience of black slaves fighting their slavemasters.

In response, EU Brexit co-ordinator Guy Verhofstadt said Ms Widdecombe was giving her party leader, Nigel Farage, “stiff competition as chief clown”.

At least she didn’t repeat her claim that science would one day “cure” gay people, even if most Brexiters like GC believe it.

Cheers,

Frog in a tree


#2471

Guy Verhofstadt said Ms Widdecombe was giving her party leader, Nigel Farage, “stiff competition as chief clown”. and hes right they make the UK seem like a bunch of uneducated racists,

Tactic now seems to be attack the EU rather than give us any positive benefits for the UK if we Leave,
wonder why??


#2472

Hi Peterthenovice, you appear to have stayed quiet and not commented on my post, you are always posting re fraudulent activity correct?

Who said Crime doesn’t pay ? I’m sure you EU Groupies completely disprove of this new appointment? After reading about your obsession with fraud and corruption that you bang on about regarding the Leave campaign, you must be distraught regarding Christines appointment.

International Monetary Fund chief Christine Lagarde has been convicted over her role in a controversial €400m (£355m) payment to a businessman.

French judges found Ms Lagarde guilty of negligence for failing to challenge the state arbitration payout to the friend of former French President Nicolas Sarkozy.


#2473

In 1926 elected representatives of the Nazi party turned their backs on the procedings in the Reichstag. It is hard to think that this wasn’t the inspiration for Farage and his far-right crew.

Frog in a tree


#2474

Since when was negligence fraud? Dolt.


#2475

I guess when it makes headlines across the world.

European Central Bank shock: Fraud case which rocked EU nominee Christine Lagarde

WHILE European Union chiefs are patting themselves on the back for nominating women for two of the bloc’s top jobs, their nod for the leadership of the powerful European Central Bank is marred by a fraud scandal.


#2476

Point is you, Farage ,Widdecombe and all the brexit nuts are trying desperately to focus on the EU
This is an example. point is whether or not Ms Lagarde has been negligent in the past is just a diversion.
because no matter what failing the EU has. The question trying to be avoided is…

Are we better off in the EU or OUT

and we are waiting for BOJO FARAGE etc to give some benefits for leaving rather than silly diversions and Respect the Vote (which was a fraud NOT negligence)

Any positive benefits for UK ? answer appreciated


#2477

What fraud?