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Brexit Wars 3

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lse:lloy
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#17369

Fynne,

The betting seems to be on a RW supporter of Johnson, possibly with a view to making an opening for Farage. This may well be wrong but that is what is indicated by who might be a gainer from the Ambassador’s removal. The conduit for the leaked messages was Isabel Oakeshott who a journalist with RW cannections. We may well never know the full truth.

Cheers,

Frog


#17370

Surely the idea that Farage might be appointed as US ambassador is beyond even the thickest Brexiteer’s fantasies? Farage himself ruled it out admitting that he is no diplomat, although he hinted he wouldn’t mind a job as some sort of special adviser (I.e. paid a lot of money for doing nothing).

He might be thinking twice about that now. One wrong word that gets back to Trump and he’s going to blow his chance for US citizenship that has been his ultimate goal for so long.


#17371

This was a fairly low level report that quite a few people saw. Some say as few as 20, but others think more than that. Even with just 20 people it is hard to prove unless someone admits it.

It was expected that there would have been more leaked but that seems less likely now after the trouble caused for all sides. I suppose that depends on who leaked it and why though.


#17372

I don’t know about hollow. He said the right thing (don’t forget he’s foreign secretary and an adult). Plenty of others are telling the truth to power though…

"Tom Tugendhat, chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee, told Sky News: “If we allow ourselves to be bullied in who we chose to represent us, then frankly, what does sovereignty mean? If you can’t even choose who represents you, then in what way are you in charge of anything?”

The Daily Mirror went with the front-page headline “Traitor Boris backs Trump not Britain.”"


#17373

I don’t think I can unite the country by making posts to an internet forum Huw. I’m quite sure you will fare no better on that one.

Nice, meaningless words again. Meanwhile, the Euro is over 20 years old. Like to bet that it won’t be around in another 20?

What a load of bull.

It isn’t my analysis. I look to the Analysis by the UK Government itself and every independent organisation that has forecast the impact.
They always show short, medium and long term ill effects… and they aren’t all related to money. Some for instance are about jobs and opportunities.

Glad that you’ve acknowledged Brexit is fucked. That was always going to be the case.

I never said I hated you or anyone else. You can bang on about your “truths” as much as you wish but they are just your wacky opinions whereas mine are based on facts every time with quoted sources.


#17374

So now you’ve changed your tune about the non-existent brain drain and switched to investment. This always happens with you lot when something you say is called out for thd bull it is.

I think there is a floid of investment capital siitting on the sidelines waiting for an outcome. Business just wznt certainty and investment is coming whatever we decide.

Of course you’ll cite some project fear article that quotes businessmen either making excuses or talking up their book.


#17375

Absolutely. It cannot survive in its current form.


#17376

So how long’s it got? 2 weeks, 6 months, another 20 years, 100 years?

In another 7 billion years the Earth will be consumed by the Sun (not your favourite rag).


#17377

Morning John,

As you’re up early… don’t forget that you’ve still failed to answer the below:

"
Whilst there are many potential improvements that could be made to the UK immigration system… you have failed to state any reason why it could not be done whilst the UK is still in the EU… and could not have been implemented at any point over the last few years.

So… why is that a reason for leaving the EU?

You also mentioned EU “uncontrolled” immigration.
I assume you are referring to the large numbers of migrants in their exodus from Africa, the Middle East (esp. Iraq and Libya) and placed like Afghanistan (to name some of the main sources).

Tell me what you think would be happening if there was no EU and no Schengen system (for those states that signed up to it)?
Do you think that the migrant crisis would magically have not happened?

There would still be boats coming to the shores of Greece and Italy… they would still be passing through those countries, there would still be some states trying to block them, some trying to help as much as they could and some hurrying them through as quick as they could.
There would still be lorries coming to English ports with migrants (from non-EU countries) trying to get in… IN or OUT of the EU.

So… again… do explain how the UK being outside of the EU is going to help stop such migrants (ie. asylum seekers and illegal migrants) from trying to get into the UK?
You think there’s be less trying to get to the UK if the EU didn’t exist?
"


#17378

Hi Pete

Hope all well with you.
In your picture caption, is that what Bojo said ?
This recently I guess.

Sorry, somewhat out of the loop on UK political news, other than reading here.

I noticed your Dyson post, had read that elsewhere yesterday.
Nice looking pad he has bought himself. So it should be for the money, quite an incredible amount for a home.

ATB

soi


#17379

JW - hi

Haven’t forgotten m8
I refer to a previous post in response
Je suis desole mais on s’en fout.
JAR


#17380

LONDON (Reuters) 11 July 2019 (that’s TODAY, @HuwJarse) - Just over half of Britain’s businesses believe the country is at risk of a brain drain after Brexit, with many worried in particular about a shortage of tech skills, according to research by cloud-based software company Salesforce.com.

Paul Smith, executive vice president of Salesforce UK, said Brexit was adding to business uncertainty at the same time as companies were grappling with unprecedented levels of technological change.

“There’s no doubt the economy is changing as new technologies emerge,” he said on Thursday.

“As business leaders, it’s clear that we need to do more to show people how reskilling and gaining new tech qualifications, often with free courses and accessible tools, is easier than many think.”


#17381

Hi Soi, the Johnson quote dates from 2015 when he was mayor of London. It is a perfect illustration of his tendency to say whatever will gain him political advantage at the time. When he said this it seemed unlikely that The Groper would win the presidency. A most unsuitable person to be PM, I think.

Frog in a tree


#17382

Not sitting on the sidelines. ITS LEFT. You just can’t admit the damage already caused, whatever happens from here - and very probably more on the way. Add to that what would have come in but hasn’t because of Brexit uncertainty. All of this was predicted and you voted for it.

Do you think people with money under management move out a trillion at a time from the UK and then just sit waiting to see how Brexit goes?

You must be even more stupid than you sound when you’re bleating about ‘project fear’. Baaaa

March 20th 2019

January 7th 2019

June 26th 2019

March 13 2019

I could go on but what’s the point of banging your head against a brick wall? I suppose all these sources are part of project fear too, are they? Project reality will dawn one day for you, but it will be way too late by then.


#17383

Project Fear! Project Fear!


#17384

You could go on and you will. None of you will ever stop bleating about the economic collapse that Brexit must surely engender.

This, the day after we learnt that the economy grew by 0.3% in the 3 months to May. The disconnect between your perception of what is happening and the economic reality could not be starker.


#17385

Huw,

I know you will say that Branson is a Remainer, which is true, but did you hear his interview on the BBC News this morning? He owns a massive company operating in many areas and he is saying that very serious damage will be done to his businesses by Brexit. I suppose you know better than him? Or maybe you just don’t care?

Frog in a tree


#17386

I was recently at a seminar hosted by the London Chamber of Commerce, and those news reports are slightly at odds with the stats provided by ComRes and The Chamber.

For instance, one of those articles that you linked mentions 7,000 jobs being cut in London*. Yet the workforce in the City of London is 513k (see below for source). So less than 1%, even if the data is a year out of date. And assets moving might be happening, but in the insurance game that situation is companies setting up the bare minimum required to move assets to, say, Brussels or Dublin. Workforce wise, the City of London is as strong as ever. From clients I speak to, who work around here, I don’t necessarily see a change in that - hard Brexit, soft Brexit or remain. We’re all fearful of the ramifications of what might pan out, but so far I haven’t seen a single change either anecdotally, with my own eyes or in the data produced by the Chamber. Although, you could argue that the Chamber have a vested interest in these matters.

Elsewhere in Britain, I don’t know. Just commenting on the City of London.

*The most recent Business Register and Employment Survey (2018), shows that 513,000 people are employed in the City of London. This represents 10% of Greater London’s employment, and 1.6% of the GB’s total employment, meaning that over 1 in 58 of the GB’s workforce are employed in the City.

Source: Office for National Statistics


#17387

Almost every financial institution in the City (and UK) has now setup a legal entity (or repurposed an existing one) to process their non-UK business (not necessarily just EU state business) through that legal entity.
The reason is so they can preserve access to their EU state client business.

You won’t see it… you either know it has happened or you don’t. A minimal number of roles have transferred to EU states thus far… only a bare minimum as you suggested. And that is because we don’t yet know what the Deal is… dependent on that, there will be further changes.

The impact of them processing business through those EU state hubs is a huge loss in Corp tax to the HMRC.
I know at least three large banks and Programme Managers who worked/still work there on these programmes… and it is a fact this money is now going to the likes of Holland, Germany and Ireland… rather than the UK.
It has been estimated that the total Corp tax loss alone is £5bn pa.


#17388

Yeah but the Euro is doing a lot better than the £ since Brexit vote. Funny that. I’d rather have been paid or have my savings in Euros than pounds over the last 3 years. My house might be worth the same in £ as 3 years ago but in Euro terms I’ve lost 100,000€. How’s that for some basic economics. Why do you think the £ is suffering so much and all the time we have to pay more and more for our food which is mostly imported? Tell the sheep farmers they will have to add 40% to the price of their lamb on 1st November. Never mind, Boris is going to do loads of deals isn’t he? Duh!